A Looming of Vultures – Richard Storry

Book blurb:

“While an ugly war with its neighbouring realm continues to rage, the insulated members of Ruritania’s upper class laugh and dance their way through their superficial lives. Some people, increasingly disillusioned by the pointless conflict, start to consider how the King might be persuaded – or forced – to end it.
Meanwhile, an increasing number of items of great value are going missing from those attending these high society gatherings. At whom will the finger of suspicion point? Who can be trusted? With so many competing, yet intertwined, agendas, what will be the outcome of this looming of vultures? “

My thoughts:

Let your imagination run free through this brilliant story of fiction. I love how the characters interact with each other and if you want a tense, edge of your seat tale, then listen to this.

The land of Ruritania is laid out in vivid and colourful descriptions, showing both the good and bad sides, even the upper classes aren’t as safe as they think they are, even from their own kind.

The narration is brought to us by the gifted Jake Urry, who I’m convinced can turn his vocal talents to almost anything, even intriguing animal sounds.

A tale of thievery, deception, trust and friendship awaits you, and yes you’ll even meet a vulture.

You can find it here:

https://www.amazon.co.uk/s/ref=nb_sb_noss?url=search-alias%3Dstripbooks&field-keywords=A+looming+of+vultures

A Mind to Kill – John Nicholl

amindtokill

Book Blurb:

The hunters become the hunted…

‘I’m in here. Come on. I’m in here. Come and play with me. I’ve been waiting for you…’

When Rebecca’s childhood abuser avoids prosecution, it sets her on a path to revenge, revenge on any man who preys on the innocent. Twenty-three-year-old Rebecca poses as a child online and sets her trap, luring one predatory paedophile after another to their deaths. When a man’s severed head is found washed up on a windswept estuary beach, the police begin their investigation.

The internationally bestselling author of White is the Coldest Colour is back with an electrifying psychological thriller packed with suspense.

Brilliantly gripping, A Mind To Kill will have you hooked from the very first page and holding your breath to the heart-racing and shocking ending.

 

My thoughts:

Ahhh! Where did I put my torch, oh this story is dark, no rainbows or unicorns here, oh how I miss them.

Well what does this story have to offer, revenge, death and hiding in plain sight, I guess you never know a person really and in this story the person on the inside you really don’t want to know.

Part of me agree’s with reasons for what happens in this book but another part of me runs screaming from it’s blood soaked tendrils, there were a few times I decided I wasn’t going to finish as the subject of the book made me squirm from the inside, but I persevered and I’m glad I did.

The subject matter might not be to everyone’s tea, some graphic torture descriptions. But the story is well researched and the writer  gives the material the respect it deserves.

Onto the writer, once again it is John Nicholls who has other great books, remember google is your friend (or this blog which i have reviewed Bully Boy Blue). Anyway John Nicholls teams up with that Welsh terror Jake Urry a force to be reckoned with indeed if you combine John’s writing and Jake’s narration then you are onto a winner.

A well written and a well told story, as I said at the beginning if you are of a weak constitution then the subject matter might not be for you, but if you can see past it you are in for a good listen.

You can find it here:

Wretchedness – Ambrose Ibsen 

wretchedness

“There is no hope.

A peculiar tablet unearthed in a Middle Eastern ossuary provokes madness in those who encounter it. One by one people come under the tablet’s sway and are subjected to horrific visions and dreams. In time, the tablet’s true purpose becomes clear: It is the harbinger of an eons-dead god whose reemergence will steep the world in terror and suffering. Having put the pieces together, two men race against the clock and attempt to disrupt the terrifying work of an ancient cult.”

My thoughts:

First thing I have to say about this book is if you are a visual person be prepared to get very uncomfortable very quickly, that’s not a bad thing, in fact it makes this book all the more special, for everyone else you will still get the impact.

I found myself at several points actually turning it off and putting something lighter and cheerier on because this story is no sunshine and lollipops, that’s why it took me so long to get to the end but glad to say I did keep going back to it.

Fear is a funny thing, it can manifest itself in many ways and in this book it was something truly horrific, I ‘enjoyed’ it and it terrified me in equal measure, not many books can do that.

If I find a stone tablet anywhere I am definitely going to leave it well alone after learning many lessons from this story.

I found the characters engaging and felt sorry for them at times, the narrator was the welsh terror Jake Urry, he did a fantastic job keeping the intensity dialed up to eleven! His descriptions of the people, places and things meant I could visualise everything.

It left me wanting to know more about the old lady, more about her past, how did she come across that tablet.

If you are looking for something with a dark side then this is the story for you, just don’t listen to it alone at night…

You can find it here:

Unethical Conduct – Arthur Cole, Nigel C.Williams

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Book blurb:

“Corrupt senior officers, a murder, a rape and a flasher. Can DI Terry McGuire’s day get any worse?

McGuire became a police officer to uphold the law and to protect those who cannot protect themselves. When he discovers a connection between a former friend and colleague and a body buried on a beach that appears to have been frozen for five years, McGuire knows there is only one course of action he can take.

With a murder, a rape and a flasher adding to McGuire’s headache, is there a connection between his colleagues and the awful events unfolding? Can McGuire stand up for what he believes and bring the perpetrators to justice, whoever they may be?”

 

My review:

Having not listened to many police procedurals, I went into this without any preconceptions and what I found was a great story.

There is a lot of research in this book, the authors, Arthur Cole and Nigel C. Williams, did their homework. Terry McGuire, the lead detective, is a well rounded and believable character, someone I certainly would not want to get on the bad side of, there are other characters also which come and go, not intrusive but also not forgetful.

The pace is good , I would have liked to have known a bit more background on the villain of the story, but mystery does breed intrigue.

Once again I am enthralled by the narrator is Jake Urry bringing his own unique brand of terror to an already dark tale.

Just when I thought Wales was a nice bright happy place, this book flips it over and shows its darker seedy underbelly, a side I’m happy to listen about and not get to close to.

These two authors are new to me, however it’s been a welcome introduction to both. At 3 hours and 40 minutes long this book is a brilliant place to start if you’re new to police procedurals or to the voice that is Jake Urry, then this book is where I would begin.

This is the first book in what looks like a great series, I’ll definatly get the rest to see where Terry ends up next.

 

Bully Boy Blue – John Nicoll

BullyBoyBlueBook blurb:

“Every aspect of Kathy’s life is dominated by her abusive bully boy husband. Now she’s pregnant and in fear for her life. Can she ever escape him?”

 

My review:

Although it is only 1 hour and 50 minutes long the story evoked so many emotional reactions from me, and at the same time I didn’t know how to feel.
The intimidating, violent and abusive husband, John Connor, finally gets his comeuppance in a very well thought through and executed plan.

The wife, Kathy, finds herself pregnant trapped and who will believe her predicament? Who will come through for her?

In the end the elaborate plan was brilliantly executed, I did wonder if it was a bit far fetched but the ingenious twists kept the intrigue going.
narrator, Jake Urry, with ‘that’ voice made this story come to life with dripping suspense.
A short but powerful story that addresses an issue that is very uncomfortable, but tackles it well.